Do halfway houses increase your chances of staying sober?

Do halfway houses increase your chances of staying sober?

Halfway houses are another avenue to increase the success rate of staying sober. Halfway houses are just another step towards freedom while allowing some stability and safety while addicts and alcoholics get back on their feet. The halfway house success rate is much higher than the rates of place that only are inpatient or outpatient treatment. If you talk to anyone with long term sobriety chances are they went to a halfway house after they went to treatment and this makes the halfway house success rate very high.

A halfway house is a bit like a practice run at real life sobriety. The lessons of drug rehab can be practiced from within a safe and sober environment before the recovering addict returns completely to the environment of temptation, and free access to drugs or alcohol. This is one of the biggest factors that contribute to the success rate of a halfway house. The fact that many addicts and alcoholics get to experience life issues while in a safe environment.

Living with fellow recovering addicts allows for fellowship, and through a shared experience, halfway house friendships are common this is another important factor in the success rate of halfway houses. Because most newly sober men and women struggle initially with recreation time and need to relearn how to enjoy life without intoxication, it can be very beneficial to maintain the support of others with a similar situation for strength against a return to substance abuse.

Clinical studies also show that the long term sobriety rates of those people that continue drug treatment in a halfway house are far better, and that aftercare participation rates remain significantly higher for those people residing in a halfway house. This also adds to the success rate of halfway houses. Some halfway houses will go so far as to mandate continuing and full participation in drug treatment aftercare as a requirement of residency, and failure to attend meetings can result in eviction from the house and program.

Although most halfway houses impose mandatory employment as a condition of residency, some also offer work training and work release programs, allowing the recovering addict to develop their employable skills in a safe and sober environment. Other educations programs are also offered. This helps an addict get a good head start on life while which can also increase the success rate of halfway houses.

Essentially, a halfway house keeps addicts motivated to sobriety; and growing together, recovering addicts learn how to fill their time without substance abuse. Recovering addicts better social interaction skills with others in a like situation, they gain valuable employment and life skills, and they are much more likely to remain active in aftercare drug treatment programming. The lessons of rehab are many, and it can be difficult to consolidate all that needs to be learned and put into practice when released into extreme temptation and little support. Through gradually increasing exposure to temptations and challenge, the continuing drug treatment at a halfway house increases the probability of success.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Success Rate of Sober Living

Success Rate of Sober Living

The success rate of sober living is unknown but it is most definitely better than the success rate of someone who doesn’t attend any kind of sober living after treatment. Lack of a stable, alcohol and drug free place to live can be a serious and almost insurmountable obstacle for addicts and alcoholics. Destructive living arrangements can totally derail recovery for even the most highly motivated addicts and alcoholics.

Sober living is an alcohol and drug free living environment for individuals attempting to abstain from alcohol and drugs. Sober living is not licensed for funded by state or local governments and the residents themselves pay for the cost. The philosophy of recovery in a sober living house emphasizes 12-step group attendance and peer support.

So what are the success rates of sober living?

Research in one California study measured treatment outcomes over an eighteen month period from a sample of patients who were provided sober living as part of their outpatient treatment. Participants were male, with an average age of around 40 years old. A fourth of them were criminal justice referrals. A third of them was either homeless or lived in a shelter. Residents were dependent on cocaine, alcohol, marijuana, heroin and amphetamines. Participants were interviewed at intake and at 6, 12, and 18 months.

The study found that sober living clients experienced significant improvements when it came to stay sober and even days worked. Involvement in 12-step groups was the strongest predictor of reductions in alcohol and drug use. The outcomes did not vary by demographics such as age, race, and education. The study concluded that sober living should be considered as a part of outpatient treatment for clients who have access to limited financial resources or reside in destructive living environments. The reason being, success of the individuals who were in sober living and staying sober.

The success rates of sober living are much higher in comparison to someone who doesn’t attend sober living. And it seems like the success rates of sober living go up even more if the clients of sober living also attend a 12-step group. The longer amount of time spent at a sober living residence the better too. Someone who stays at a sober living home and attends a 12-step group for a long period of time usually has a much higher chance of success than someone who just goes back to the original living environment and does not attend a 12 step group.

I know this is especially true for myself and most of the people I know who have multiple years sober. Sober living really can get addicts and alcoholics who have been unstable for so long the ability to start off on a stable and sturdy foundation instead of going back into the same unsteadiness once again. The success rates of sober living aren’t exact but they are good. The risks of going back into an old environment or giving yourself a better chance at staying sober with a sober living environment seems like an easy choice to make.

 

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

How to Start a Halfway House

How to Start a Halfway House

 

What is a Halfway House?

Halfway Houses are transitional living places for those in recovery from drugs or alcohol. They are also called sober houses. Some people go to halfway houses from a treatment center, prison, or a homeless situation, while others go there to be in a sober and clean environment to begin the recovery process. Some residents are in halfway houses due to court orders.

Aspects of a Halfway House

Many halfway houses are run by people who themselves were at one time a halfway house resident. The houses accommodate either men or women. Most halfway houses require residents to pass breathalyzer and drug screening tests. Some houses have curfews.

Make sure the house is located so that your residents can easily get to AA and NA meetings. In recovery, we are self-supporting. Be certain that you are clear on what is expected from you and what you expect from your residents. Assign cleaning chores, including making their beds and keeping their rooms tidy.

Choose a house near public transportation for those of your residents who do not have their own transportation.

Why You Should Start a Halfway House

You should only open a halfway house if you are passionate about the cause. And, if you are passionate, it can be done with little or no money. There are various grants and loans available to get a house started. Learn from experience and check with someone who already has a house to see how to open one.

How to Start a Halfway House

Step 1: Acquire the licenses and permits needed to operate a halfway house in the community you select.

Step 2: Purchase or lease a property. Your financial circumstances may dictate this choice, but county, city, township and other lawmaking agencies frequently require property ownership before they are willing to sanction a halfway house in a residential neighborhood. Once you find one or more likely properties, have your top choices inspected by a certified building inspector to avoid “buyer’s remorse.”

Step 3: Renovate the property. Unless the home you buy was operated as a halfway house in the past, you’ll likely have to modify it to accommodate zoning laws that sanction the number of people you can house there, or any personal limits you’ve placed on resident capacity. Purchase insurance to cover the house and its contents, and add liability coverage to protect your personal assets from lawsuits. A regular homeowner’s policy isn’t adequate for a group home.

Step 4: Hire staff and create policies, rules and regulations. Having staff in place before the first resident arrives is a huge advantage, because experienced halfway house employees can help you write an operations manual and set rules, regulations and policies that will guide both clients and staff. Make sure you run background checks on everyone, from counselors to housekeeping employees.

Step 5: Set up the accounting aspects of your halfway house so it operates smoothly well into the future. Accurate records are important if you want your sponsors to continue making financial contributions, and it goes without saying that finding additional sponsors will be an ongoing activity.

Step 6: Implement programming. Residents released from rehab programs require an inordinate amount of structure in their lives so they can learn to become responsible members of both the halfway house and the outside world. Establish tight schedules that include mandated housekeeping chores, group counseling sessions, one-on-one therapy time, recreational activities, job searching and life skill building time. Plan social events, meetings and include alone time.

Remember: It is unlawful to discriminate in housing. The Supreme Court has ruled that recovering alcoholics and drug addicts are a protected class under the handicapped provisions of the Federal Fair Housing Act Amendments of 1988. If you seek a house in a good neighborhood, you’ll find it.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.sba.gov

http://halfwayhouse.com

http://smallbusiness.chron.com

http://soberhouse.net

 

 

 

 

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Half way house

Half way house

Half way houses essentially are transitional living spaces for anyone who is in recovery from drugs and alcohol. You may also know half way houses as sober living or sober living houses, this is because in some states it is legally required that those terms be used. The people who go to half way houses usually go after they have been in drug treatment, prison, or have been homeless. Other people go to half way houses merely because they want to be in a sober environment to begin their recovery. There also some people who are court ordered to half way houses.

Half way houses can be private homes, apartments, or facilities specially built to provide support services to residents. Half way houses are not usually run down or scary. Depending on the location and type of half way house, they are fairly nice. Half way houses are usually decorated, come with all the furniture, amenities, kitchens, bathrooms, bedrooms that can hold one or two residents, pools, backyards and more. The half way house is not only a place for people to get sober but also a place for having fun sober and socializing.

For instance, in a half way house there are rules dealing with curfew, how many meetings a resident has to attend, whether or not a resident has to have a sponsor and during what times they can be in the house. Most half way houses are trying to help you get sober and also get your life back on track. So some half way houses have rules that say you must be out looking for a job, volunteering or working-if you aren’t doing those things than you can’t stay there. When it comes to curfew at a half way house it usually starts out fairly early and after a resident has been there for a while and successfully followed the rules, gets later. There are also chores that must be done daily and punishments for not doing them. The whole point of a half way house is to teach accountability, responsibility and sobriety. The strictness of the rules at a half way house varies from house to house.

More often than not half way houses require their future residents to pass a breathalyzer and a drug test. This is because if you were to have substances in your body, you may need the help of a medical facility for detox. The withdrawal symptoms from drugs can be very painful and sometimes fatal so it is best if future residents can’t pass a drug test or breathalyzer to go to a medical detox.     

Half way houses are quite frequently run by people who are also in recovery and were in a half way house at one point in their life. Half way houses usually are separated by gender. This means that most half way houses are either for only women or only men. The person who runs the half way house determines this. The person who runs the halfway house also determines some of the half way house rules.

A half way house merely is a residential place for those who need a safe place to transition back into the world again and to do it sober.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

How to fight emotional triggers in recovery

How to fight emotional triggers in recovery

Triggers are specific memories, behaviors, thoughts, emotions, and situations that jeopardize recovery. Triggers are signals you are entering a stage that brings you closer to a relapse. Triggers are the stimuli, the people, places, situations, emotional states, thoughts, etc. that can “trigger” an ingrained ritualistic response which in most cases is to get high. Learning to identify relapse triggers and especially the emotional intensity that they invoke can be an effective tool in how to fight emotional triggers in recovery.

If you really want to know how to fight emotional triggers in recovery then the best place you can start is by learning what they are. For instance, deep sadness or extreme excitement might be emotional states that trigger you. If you know those are your emotional triggers in recovery then you can begin to fight against them.

Once you know what your emotional triggers in recovery are you can then begin to set in a place a plan of action for yourself. A plan of action for fighting emotional triggers in recovery can consist of multiple different things. For instance say an emotional trigger in recovery for you is excitement. If you begin to feel that excitement and it makes you think about using you can have a plan that first consist of calling a sober support, second doing something to get your mind off of it. No matter what it is that you use to fight emotional triggers in recovery make sure that you are taking action. Change your state.

A good way to fight emotional triggers in recovery is to go for a run when you begin thinking about using. You could also choose to turn on some music and dance your heart out. You can go workout at the gym. You can go for a bike ride. You can meditate. You can read a book. You can really do whatever it is that works for you to fight emotional triggers in recovery as long as it’s something different than what you would normally do. A lot of the times when addicts and alcoholics feel emotionally triggered in recovery they don’t know why they are thinking about using and they have no idea what to do instead of go and get high. This can lead to relapse without the proper identification of what is going on and what to do when it happens.

This is why identifying what triggers you emotionally and then making a plan of action for yourself when emotional triggers pop up is the best way to fight emotional triggers in recovery. It is not easy to fight emotional triggers in recovery in fact addicts and alcoholics are hardwired to use in certain instances that’s why its good to have a plan in place before you are ever get triggered. Once you are able to implement your plan to fight emotional triggers in recovery multiple times it will get easier to ward off. If you make a habit of fighting your emotional triggers in recovery eventually it won’t be so difficult and then you may even find you aren’t triggered by the emotional states at all now.

 

 

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Demi Lovato in Sober Living

Demi Lovato in Sober Living

 

Demi Lovato in Sober Living     

Demi Lovato is a beautiful young Disney star who has also struggled with the darkness of bulimia, cutting, and bipolar disorder. And she hasn’t tried to hide it. Demi Lovato is in sober living and she has been very vocal about her struggles. Demi Lovato chose to stay in sober living because she felt it would help resist relapsing. And this is what sober living is all about. Sober living is mean to give the individual a safe place to go when they are struggling. Demi Lovato’s struggles with her eating disorders, cutting and bipolar show us all that diseases such as this can affect everyone and anyone. They also show us that everyone needs a little help sometimes to get through hard times in their life and there is no shame in that. Sober living is available for a purpose.

So what is sober living exactly? Sober living is also known as a halfway house. After completing some form of treatment, it is imperative for individuals to go into sober housing so that they can rebuild the lost link with the real world and with sobriety. It’s important that they have confidence and a positive approach. Sober living helps individuals such as Demi Lovato, to maintain their sobriety once their treatment program is completed.

• Sober living provides a real life environment to the addicts in contrast to a treatment center. By providing homely atmosphere, they help a person to cope up with stress and pressures of outside life while seeking support in a safe environment.

Individuals living at sober living are made to do constructive activities to occupy time and make them live without the use of their eating disorder, addiction etc.

  • Sober living keeps a resident agreement, which has to be signed by each new resident. This warns them from using alcohol or any kind of drug and also in a case such as Demi Lovato’s asks them not to act out on their disorders. They will also conduct frequent medical checkups to see whether the residents are going as per the agreement. If any one goes against the agreement, they will be asked to leave sober living.
  • Sober living holds a resident as the head of the house and another resident as the peer coordinator. These two heads help and keep the house in order to make sure all the necessary things needed for a new resident to recover are available.
  • Most sober living facilities conduct weekly meetings. This helps in evaluating the progress of recovery for each individual.
  • Sober living conducts frequent alcohol tests and drug screening. Sober living also asks each resident in the house to keep an accountability agreement. This means that if one person sees another person acting out on an eating disorder, cutting etc. then they will tell the head of the house or the manager of the sober living facility

Sober living is a great place for addicts, alcoholics, and those struggling with other disease or behavioral issues to find a safe place to get their lives back on track. Demi Lovato used sober living for this exact purpose.

Sources: http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/gossip/demi-lovato-residing-sober-living-facility-year-article-1.1238340

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Best Cities for Sober Living

Best Cities for Sober Living

Best Cities for Sober Living

You can get and stay sober anywhere. And living in a city with a thriving recovery community won’t keep you sober. However, sometimes it is easier to start a clean and sober lifestyle in an environment where there are a lot of other people with the same goals. Here are the seven best cities for sober living:

Best Cities for Sober Living: Boston, MA

Once named the drunkest city in America, Boston has one of the most thriving sober living communities. Not only is Boston an incredibly cerebral place to live, it is home to an abundantly large option of AA meetings.  In addition, the city hosts a “commitment exchange” program, through which local AA groups send members to speak at other meetings, allowing them to expand their sober network.

Best Cities for Sober Living: Delray Beach, FL

In 2008, the New York Times named Delray Beach the “Recovery Capital of America.” Delray is home to over 300 12 step meetings a week, 40 inpatient treatment centers within 20 miles of town, and countless sober houses. The meetings serve the most concentrated population of former drunks and junkies in the US. In a town with a population of 64,000, residents in recovery (about 5,000 strong) are a big part of the Delray Beach community.

Best Cities for Sober Living: Houston, TX

Houston boasts many twelve step clubhouses, where meetings are held virtually 24/7. These are great places for fellowship and socializing. Altogether, Houston has 580 AA groups, which collectively hold around 2,400 meetings a week.

Best Cities for Sober Living: Los Angeles, CA

LA has always been one of the best cities for sober living. West Coast addicts rave about the thriving recovery community, sober social events, and great message for the newcomer. Celebrities in recovery are often in attendance at LA 12 step meetings, and some even act as “circuit speakers,” touring big groups in the area and sharing their experience, strength, and hope. LA is also home to tons of treatment facilities and sober living homes.

Best Cities for Sober Living: Minneapolis, MN

You can’t go a block in Minneapolis without finding an AA meeting. Home to one of the pioneer addiction treatment centers in the US, Hazelden, Minneapolis has been called “The Land of 1,000 Treatment Centers.” Minneapolis is also home to 11 of the country’s 35 public sober high schools. The 12 step community in this city is well-established and thriving.

Best Cities for Sober Living: Nashville, TN

With just 8.92 drinks consumed per citizen per week, this is the “soberest city” in the United States. But for those who do not drink at all, there are 280 meetings each week, and the AA community hosts around ten events per month.

Best Cities for Sober Living: New York, NY

The city that never sleeps can be a great place to party and also a great place to get sober. Like LA, you may run into a celebrity at one of your 12 step meetings in New York. The city has over 4,000 AA meetings every week.  For pretty much any holiday, there is a sober counterpart in New York, so there is a ton to do.

Source:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/18/best-sober-living-cities_n_1528700.html#slide=996068

 

 

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Are pets allowed in sober living?

Pets in sober house

Are pets allowed in sober living?

Whether or not pets are allowed in sober living is determined on an individual basis. Each sober living environment has different rules and allows different things. But there is some sober living that allows pets. And according to them they have good reason for it. Other sober living places do not allow pets and they also have good reasons for it. Regardless, if you are wondering if pets are allowed in sober living than you have to look for a specific sober living environment which can provide you the ability to do so.

The reason some sober living facilities allow pets is because they want you to have the comfort home.  So what’s the point of allowing pets in sober living?  It sincerely allows everyone the chance to participate in the program.  In a lot of instance pets are someone’s best friend, there is no one to take care of your pet, or your pet is very important to you; now think, would it hinder your decision to enter a sober living facility if he or she was not allowed to accompany you?  Sober living that allows pets affords individuals who have had pets in their past a chance to continue along their path of sobriety while surrounding themselves with a trusted pet. This can give those who are early in recovery a way to be accountable and feel more comfortable because they have their trusty companion.

The reason some sober living facilities don’t allow pets are because of the potential mess, clean up, other people in the sober living home etc. Sober living facilities are very similar to renting apartments where you don’t get to pick your roommates. It can be really difficult for some sober living homes to allow pets because not everyone in the sober living home likes pets. Not only that but those in the sober living home who want to bring their pet with them may find that they don’t have time and can’t be accountable so early in sobriety. One of the biggest factors of pets not being allowed in sober living is the damage potential. Sober living asks for rent and has no pet deposit fee and is not like an apartment where it is furnished with your furniture. So therefore if they allowed pets in sober living and something got damaged the sober living home would be responsible for replacing those items.

Either way if you want to know if pets are allowed in sober living than your best bet is to search for sober living and call to see what they can do for you. Many sober living homes will accommodate to you and your pet if you want to bring it with you but some other ones will have a strict no pet policy due to the many risk factors. Either way the whole point of sober living is for you to begin your lifetime journey into being a healthy, happy, member of society and regardless of whether or not they allow your pet you will be with them soon enough!

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

The dangers of living on your own after rehab

The dangers of living on your own after rehab

 

There are dangers of living on your own after rehab but there are also dangers of living on your own in any situation. Unfortunately for those straight out of rehab the dangers are a little bit different than they are for other people. This has to do a lot with the fact that addicts and alcoholics after rehab can relapse and also may not have the life skills needed to support themselves living on their own due to their drug use and drinking for so long.

Living on your own after rehab – Relapsing

The biggest and most obvious danger of living on your own after rehab is the potential to relapse. Not all addicts and alcoholics who live on their own after rehab end up relapsing but many do because of the lack of accountability. This is why most rehabs will recommend a stay at a halfway house after rehab. When an addict or alcoholic begins living on their own after rehab it is not guaranteed that they have stopped obsessing about doing drugs and drinking. With no one around to make sure they aren’t drinking and that they are doing what they are supposed to do for their recovery this can easily lead to an alcoholic or addict thinking they can get drunk or high again with no problems. Also there is no potential for getting caught when an addict and alcoholic lives on their own after rehab. The consequences are not as tangible and can’t be imagined as easily because there really are no consequences such as getting kicked out of a halfway house and becoming homeless etc. There are no drug tests, no other people in recovery, nothing to make sure the addict and alcoholic won’t end up drinking and using drugs again.

Living on your own after rehab – Self-Care

The second and other biggest danger of living on your own after rehab is the ability to take care of yourself. Many addicts and alcoholics come into rehab with no idea on how to live a manageable and functional life. Many younger addicts and alcoholics have no life experiences whatsoever. In fact some may not know how to cook, hold a job, or fend for themselves. This can become a disaster waiting to happen. Usually it is good for an addict or alcoholic to spend some time in a halfway house to begin learning these things and getting a job before they are totally on their own. Living on their own straight out of rehab can lead to reckless spending, addictive habits (that may or may not be using drugs and drinking) such as unsafe sex, gambling, etc. This is all because there is no one to hold them accountable to doing what they should be doing to take care of themselves. A lot of addicts and alcoholics find themselves living on their own with empty apartments that have nothing but a mattress on the floor because they have no realization what it takes to build a home. The little things have always been taken care of for them.

These are the two biggest dangers of living on your own after rehab. This is why if you really want to propel your future in recovery it probably is the best decision to spend some time at a halfway house being accountable and learning to take care of yourself again and a halfway house can give you this. A halfway house can’t guarantee sobriety but it can make it a little bit easier to get the hang of things. Living on your own after rehab is a danger you don’t want to risk. Especially because it can lead to relapse if action towards recovery isn’t taken and relapse could mean death.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

When is it time to leave sober living?

When is it time to leave sober living?

After you leave treatment, you will need to make a decision on where to go afterwards. For many people, returning home is dangerous. Going back to the life you were living before treatment can be the first step down a road to relapse. Your chances of staying clean and sober are far greater if you choose to go to a sober living environment. Sober living provides structure which can be an essential step between treatment and living on your own. At a sober living residence, you will be able to live with like-minded individuals and build a support structure that is crucial to your new life.

Once you move in though, how long should you stay? When do you know it is time to leave sober living? These are tough questions, and no one really ever knows for sure when you should leave sober living. Some people stay over a year, but once they are out, they relapse almost immediately. Others stay for a few months but they do quite well on their own. Generally, though, the staff and other professionals at sober living, plus your sponsor will be able to determine when it is time to leave sober living.

Keep in mind that if you’re basing your decision to leave sober living on financial difficulties, personality conflicts, standard of living complaints, or dislike of the rules at sober living; you may be leaving before you are ready. Part of living at a sober living home is learning to live with a structure and other people. If you plan to stay in sober living for an extended period of time, it is important to find one within your budget so that financial difficulties don’t force you to leave before you’re ready.

For the best chances of success, plan to stay at least 6 months in a sober living home. However, just because you have stayed six months does not mean that it is time to leave sober living! It is also important to be firmly grounded in a twelve step program like Alcoholics Anonymous. This means consistently attending meetings, having a good sponsor and working the 12 steps with them, and developing a strong fellowship with other people in the A.A. program.  These are the keys to staying sober whether you are in a sober living residence or not.

Also, if you have made a commitment to stay longer at a sober living home then stick to it. Part of being sober is fulfilling commitments and being accountable to other people. If you start to think it is time to leave sober living before your commitment is up, you may want to examine your motives beforehand. Ideally, there should be no reason to leave sober living except that you are truly ready to live on your own. Make sure you speak to your sponsor, therapist, and house manager when making the decision to leave sober living.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.