How to Start a Halfway House

How to Start a Halfway House

 

What is a Halfway House?

Halfway Houses are transitional living places for those in recovery from drugs or alcohol. They are also called sober houses. Some people go to halfway houses from a treatment center, prison, or a homeless situation, while others go there to be in a sober and clean environment to begin the recovery process. Some residents are in halfway houses due to court orders.

Aspects of a Halfway House

Many halfway houses are run by people who themselves were at one time a halfway house resident. The houses accommodate either men or women. Most halfway houses require residents to pass breathalyzer and drug screening tests. Some houses have curfews.

Make sure the house is located so that your residents can easily get to AA and NA meetings. In recovery, we are self-supporting. Be certain that you are clear on what is expected from you and what you expect from your residents. Assign cleaning chores, including making their beds and keeping their rooms tidy.

Choose a house near public transportation for those of your residents who do not have their own transportation.

Why You Should Start a Halfway House

You should only open a halfway house if you are passionate about the cause. And, if you are passionate, it can be done with little or no money. There are various grants and loans available to get a house started. Learn from experience and check with someone who already has a house to see how to open one.

How to Start a Halfway House

Step 1: Acquire the licenses and permits needed to operate a halfway house in the community you select.

Step 2: Purchase or lease a property. Your financial circumstances may dictate this choice, but county, city, township and other lawmaking agencies frequently require property ownership before they are willing to sanction a halfway house in a residential neighborhood. Once you find one or more likely properties, have your top choices inspected by a certified building inspector to avoid “buyer’s remorse.”

Step 3: Renovate the property. Unless the home you buy was operated as a halfway house in the past, you’ll likely have to modify it to accommodate zoning laws that sanction the number of people you can house there, or any personal limits you’ve placed on resident capacity. Purchase insurance to cover the house and its contents, and add liability coverage to protect your personal assets from lawsuits. A regular homeowner’s policy isn’t adequate for a group home.

Step 4: Hire staff and create policies, rules and regulations. Having staff in place before the first resident arrives is a huge advantage, because experienced halfway house employees can help you write an operations manual and set rules, regulations and policies that will guide both clients and staff. Make sure you run background checks on everyone, from counselors to housekeeping employees.

Step 5: Set up the accounting aspects of your halfway house so it operates smoothly well into the future. Accurate records are important if you want your sponsors to continue making financial contributions, and it goes without saying that finding additional sponsors will be an ongoing activity.

Step 6: Implement programming. Residents released from rehab programs require an inordinate amount of structure in their lives so they can learn to become responsible members of both the halfway house and the outside world. Establish tight schedules that include mandated housekeeping chores, group counseling sessions, one-on-one therapy time, recreational activities, job searching and life skill building time. Plan social events, meetings and include alone time.

Remember: It is unlawful to discriminate in housing. The Supreme Court has ruled that recovering alcoholics and drug addicts are a protected class under the handicapped provisions of the Federal Fair Housing Act Amendments of 1988. If you seek a house in a good neighborhood, you’ll find it.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.sba.gov

http://halfwayhouse.com

http://smallbusiness.chron.com

http://soberhouse.net

 

 

 

 

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Summer Sober Houses

Summer Sober Houses

Many times summer is filled with drinking, trips to beach houses and parties at night. For the alcoholic and addict in recovery it can be hard to find a summer vacation place that is safe and sober. Luckily, there are ways for addicts and alcoholics to party up during the summer in summer sober houses.

Summer sober houses are just like any other normal house except the people who stay in them don’t drink or do alcohol. Instead of having a cocktail hour in the evening they have a meeting, instead of spending their days sipping on fruity alcoholic beverages they go surfing or hiking and instead of getting sloppy drunk at the bar down the street-they go down to the beach and admire the moon. There is a lot life has to offer people who are in sobriety and summer sober houses are an addition to that.

Summer sober houses can be found all over the coast where any normal person would go on their summer vacation. Summer sober houses are just like rental houses except they are for the person who needs a safe place where there isn’t going to be much drinking around and they can be around people who are of the same state of mind as they are. It is really beneficial for addicts and alcoholics when they want to do things that normally involve drinking, to do those things with other people. And this means renting a beach house or summer home. Summer sober houses usually house the same amount of people as a normal rental summer home would except the residents have to go through kind of an interview process. It is not recommended that anyone with only days sober go and rent a summer sober house with their friends because the areas in beach towns still have a lot of temptation nearby but for those who have a little bit more clean time a summer sober house can be the ideal spot to enjoy the warmer months out of the year.

Of course the activities in a summer sober house are different than a normal one and they include everything from surfing, to hiking, to playing cards, to going out to eat, to paddle boarding, to tanning, to getting ice cream etc. Everything but getting intoxicated. In fact some people who stay in summer sober houses do go to the bar for a little bit of dancing but they always have other sober people around them that they go with-they never go alone.

Summer sober houses are the newest and latest thing for those people in recovery who are still looking to have a little fun in the sun minus the cocktails.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Lies That Addicts Tell Their Loved Ones

Lies That Addicts Tell Their Loved Ones

Lying is a well-known part of addiction. They are a natural and virtually automatic way of life for addicts. Addicts lie to themselves, to their loved ones, and to the world. They lie about big things and small things, and they often get so caught up in their lies that they don’t even know the truth anymore. Here are some common lies that addicts tell their loved ones and the reasons they do it:

Lies That Addicts Tell Their Loved Ones: Lies to cover up addiction

What it sounds like:

“I only had a couple drinks last night.”

“That isn’t mine; I’m holding it for a friend”

“I don’t drink/use every day”

Why they do it:

Although not all addictive behaviors are against the law, many are. Even those that aren’t are highly stigmatized, even if, like drinking, they are socially acceptable in moderation. It becomes second nature for people with addictions to cover up their addictive behavior because they know, deep down, that if anyone knew how much they used/drank; they would have to make a change. Loved ones would be concerned and/or judge them.

Lies That Addicts Tell Their Loved Ones: Lies to avoid confrontation

What it sounds like:

“I can’t make it to your house to talk, I have to do X, Y, or Z.”

“I need these medications; a doctor prescribed them to me.”

“I’m not that bad, you’re overreacting.”

“I don’t drink as much as [other person]; he/she is the one who really needs help.”

Why they do it:

Although loved ones of addicts often find them confrontational, in reality, they often want to avoid confrontation, especially when it is about their behavior. To avoid confrontation they may get really angry to try to manipulate you into backing down or they may simply lie. Addicts rely heavily on drugs and alcohol to be able to cope with the stresses of life. Being confronted by another person is very stressful, and it is something they have a hard time dealing with. They may even try to make you believe it is your fault they are using because you confronted them in the first place.

Lies That Addicts Tell Their Loved Ones: Lies to avoid negative consequences

What it sounds like:

“I didn’t steal that”

“I can’t do it today, I’m sick”

“My car broke down; I’m not going to make it in”

Why they do it:

Addicts lie to protect themselves. They know if they tell the truth, they will have to face negative consequences-losing jobs, relationships, or even facing legal charges. It is much easier to lie than to own up to the fact that their using/drinking is affecting their everyday life and/or causing them to break the law.

Lies That Addicts Tell Their Loved Ones: Lies where they are the victim

What it sounds like:

“It’s your fault I drink/use drugs. If I didn’t have such a terrible childhood, I wouldn’t need them”

“If you had to deal with the things I have, you would be drinking too.”

Why they do it:

These are lies that the addict themselves may not even realize are lies. They may even be based on a kernel of truth. It is their way of transferring blame for their addiction to another person or situation. They love to play the victim, and will use anything negative events in their lives as an excuse to keep using or drinking. If they don’t have the responsibility for using or drinking, they also don’t have the responsibility for quitting.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.