Success Rate of Sober Living

Success Rate of Sober Living

The success rate of sober living is unknown but it is most definitely better than the success rate of someone who doesn’t attend any kind of sober living after treatment. Lack of a stable, alcohol and drug free place to live can be a serious and almost insurmountable obstacle for addicts and alcoholics. Destructive living arrangements can totally derail recovery for even the most highly motivated addicts and alcoholics.

Sober living is an alcohol and drug free living environment for individuals attempting to abstain from alcohol and drugs. Sober living is not licensed for funded by state or local governments and the residents themselves pay for the cost. The philosophy of recovery in a sober living house emphasizes 12-step group attendance and peer support.

So what are the success rates of sober living?

Research in one California study measured treatment outcomes over an eighteen month period from a sample of patients who were provided sober living as part of their outpatient treatment. Participants were male, with an average age of around 40 years old. A fourth of them were criminal justice referrals. A third of them was either homeless or lived in a shelter. Residents were dependent on cocaine, alcohol, marijuana, heroin and amphetamines. Participants were interviewed at intake and at 6, 12, and 18 months.

The study found that sober living clients experienced significant improvements when it came to stay sober and even days worked. Involvement in 12-step groups was the strongest predictor of reductions in alcohol and drug use. The outcomes did not vary by demographics such as age, race, and education. The study concluded that sober living should be considered as a part of outpatient treatment for clients who have access to limited financial resources or reside in destructive living environments. The reason being, success of the individuals who were in sober living and staying sober.

The success rates of sober living are much higher in comparison to someone who doesn’t attend sober living. And it seems like the success rates of sober living go up even more if the clients of sober living also attend a 12-step group. The longer amount of time spent at a sober living residence the better too. Someone who stays at a sober living home and attends a 12-step group for a long period of time usually has a much higher chance of success than someone who just goes back to the original living environment and does not attend a 12 step group.

I know this is especially true for myself and most of the people I know who have multiple years sober. Sober living really can get addicts and alcoholics who have been unstable for so long the ability to start off on a stable and sturdy foundation instead of going back into the same unsteadiness once again. The success rates of sober living aren’t exact but they are good. The risks of going back into an old environment or giving yourself a better chance at staying sober with a sober living environment seems like an easy choice to make.

 

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Everything you need to know about sober living

Everything you need to know about sober living

Everything you need to know about sober living

When my therapist first suggested that I move into sober living after treatment, I was kind of wary. I didn’t really know anything about sober living houses. As the terms “halfway house” and “sober living house” are sometimes used interchangeably, I thought these were the same kind of homes that parolees had to go after getting out of jail. I envisioned a slightly homier version of a jail cell, with barred windows and lock down after curfew. I agreed to go because I was desperate, and I was pleasantly surprised that the sober living homes were much different than I imagined.

Everything you need to know about sober living: Sober living homes are not homeless shelters

Before I moved into a sober living home, I thought that they were all run-down, sober versions of homeless shelters. I’d heard horror stories about “flop houses” where the residents just did drugs with impunity and came and went as they pleased. My preconceived notions couldn’t have been further from the truth. Sure, flop houses do exist, as do homeless shelters and halfway houses for parolees that enforce sobriety, but a true sober living home is something else. The good ones are generally well kept and clean, and the people living in them are people trying to get on their feet after going to treatment. These homes give recovering addict a place to call home while they navigate the waters of early sobriety.  Sober living homes are definitely not free, everyone is expected to pay their share of rent and groceries, and some sober living homes are quite exclusive.

Everything you need to know about sober living: You have rules

I never thought much about the rules in a sober living home, but once I lived there, I had to abide by a certain set of rules. In my experience, there are similar rules in most sober living environments. Obviously, you cannot drink, use drugs, or possess any kind of drug paraphernalia. Sober living homes regularly drug test the residents. Most sober living homes also enforce a curfew and require you to have an approved pass to spend the night out. My sober living home strictly prohibited men from being anywhere on the property, but we were allowed to have female friends and relatives over to visit. We were required to get a job, get a sponsor, and go to at least one meeting a day. We each had chores, and they did room checks every morning to make sure we were doing them. We had a zero tolerance rule for drug use. If a resident failed a drug test, they had to go to detox and test clean before they were allowed to come back to the sober living home. Communal living was the order of the day, and we all pitched in and helped out when things needed to be done. When things didn’t get done, we all often shared in the punishment as well. If one person didn’t do chores, we all were put on early curfew. In this way, we were encouraged to keep each other accountable.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Sober Living Environment History

Sober Living Environment History

The origins of sober living environments are thought to be started in England during the 1800s. The first “halfway house” was established in the United States in Pennsylvania in 1817. Sober living environments or halfway houses were first used as traveler’s stops. For example a halfway house in Illinois was a place for a person traveling to and from Chicago in the 1800s. It was built in 1843 and was used as a stopping place for weary travelers. These halfway houses of course are not called halfway houses anymore they are known as “motels” or “inns” which we still use today.

Sober living environment which includes halfway houses and sober living homes are for those who are chemically dependent on a substance such as alcohol or drugs. Those who are dependent on alcohol or drugs go to halfway houses after receiving treatment at a treatment center. The term halfway house which is different from the term used in the 1800s for the weary travelers was adopted by the treatment industry. It is not a requirement to stay at a halfway house or sober living environment in order to stay sober but those who do choose to go to a sober living environment do so for about three to six months.

Sober living environments and halfway houses have also been used to house criminals and have been and are controversial. In one incident that happened in British Columbia, three murderers in an area were connected with a halfway house. People who lived near the house were trying to get the federal law changed regarding recent parolees and halfway houses.

And new in sober living environment history; recently China opened its first halfway house for Internet addiction. This sober living environment is only for minors who stay in the house for one night while away from their parents. This sober living environment was established because of fears of children getting hooked on video games.

Sober living environment history or halfway house history has come a long way but the term halfway house and sober living environment is almost strictly used now days to describe a place where men and women can go to complete their formal treatment and to remain sober. Sober living environments are now a common staple for those in recovery and can be found in different neighborhoods and areas all over the United States and world.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.