Do halfway houses increase your chances of staying sober?

Do halfway houses increase your chances of staying sober?

Halfway houses are another avenue to increase the success rate of staying sober. Halfway houses are just another step towards freedom while allowing some stability and safety while addicts and alcoholics get back on their feet. The halfway house success rate is much higher than the rates of place that only are inpatient or outpatient treatment. If you talk to anyone with long term sobriety chances are they went to a halfway house after they went to treatment and this makes the halfway house success rate very high.

A halfway house is a bit like a practice run at real life sobriety. The lessons of drug rehab can be practiced from within a safe and sober environment before the recovering addict returns completely to the environment of temptation, and free access to drugs or alcohol. This is one of the biggest factors that contribute to the success rate of a halfway house. The fact that many addicts and alcoholics get to experience life issues while in a safe environment.

Living with fellow recovering addicts allows for fellowship, and through a shared experience, halfway house friendships are common this is another important factor in the success rate of halfway houses. Because most newly sober men and women struggle initially with recreation time and need to relearn how to enjoy life without intoxication, it can be very beneficial to maintain the support of others with a similar situation for strength against a return to substance abuse.

Clinical studies also show that the long term sobriety rates of those people that continue drug treatment in a halfway house are far better, and that aftercare participation rates remain significantly higher for those people residing in a halfway house. This also adds to the success rate of halfway houses. Some halfway houses will go so far as to mandate continuing and full participation in drug treatment aftercare as a requirement of residency, and failure to attend meetings can result in eviction from the house and program.

Although most halfway houses impose mandatory employment as a condition of residency, some also offer work training and work release programs, allowing the recovering addict to develop their employable skills in a safe and sober environment. Other educations programs are also offered. This helps an addict get a good head start on life while which can also increase the success rate of halfway houses.

Essentially, a halfway house keeps addicts motivated to sobriety; and growing together, recovering addicts learn how to fill their time without substance abuse. Recovering addicts better social interaction skills with others in a like situation, they gain valuable employment and life skills, and they are much more likely to remain active in aftercare drug treatment programming. The lessons of rehab are many, and it can be difficult to consolidate all that needs to be learned and put into practice when released into extreme temptation and little support. Through gradually increasing exposure to temptations and challenge, the continuing drug treatment at a halfway house increases the probability of success.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Relapse Excuses

Relapse Excuses

There is no good excuse for a relapse. However, there are several emotional triggers that are commonly used excuses people will use in order to justify a relapse.

Relapse Excuse #1. Resentment

Many of us have probably heard this: Resentments will take you back out. Holding a resentment is probably the most common relapse excuse. Resentments are usually in the form of:

Perceiving that others are trying to control their life

Expectations not being met

Perceiving that others are acting as if they are superior

Perceiving others to be hypocrites, taking others’ inventory

Superiors who abuse their power

Being hurt but others saying or doing something that negatively impacts the their self-esteem

When other people lie

Feeling slighted

Perceiving others to act unfair towards them and/or others

Relapse Excuse #2. Anger

“Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die” When feeling angry towards someone else, the recovering addict/alcoholic often thinks that they will punish these other people by relapsing; of course the only person they are going to hurt is themselves.

Relapse Excuse #3. Boredom

After getting clean and sober, you might find that you have a lot of free time on your hands. Without hobbies or pursuing other healthy interests, you may become bored. This is another common relapse excuse: boredom. When we become bored, we may begin romanticizing our previous lifestyle, remembering the “good ol’ times” and conveniently forget about all the horrible stuff. This is a dangerous trend because, in the newly sober person’s mind, addiction wasn’t so bad after all. That mindset combined with agony of boredom is enough to convince most that relapse is the way to remedy their situation.

Relapse Excuse #4. Loneliness

This is kind of like the boredom excuse. When we stop drinking and drugging, we have to change people, places, and things. We may begin to miss our drinking and using buddies and, if we are not proactive in making new sober friends and getting sober supports in our life, then being lonely is the perfect relapse excuse.

Relapse Excuse #5. Disappointment in sobriety

As recovering addicts and alcoholics, we are used to instant gratification. That said, a life beyond our wildest in dreams in recovery takes time. Often times, we have to rebuild our lives from scratch. For some in recovery, this is frustrating and upsetting. They expect results and immediately! When this doesn’t happen, they will use that as an excuse to relapse

Relapse Excuse #6. Feeling depressed

Many addicts and alcoholics also have a co-occurring, or dual diagnosis mental disorder such as depression or bipolar disorder. In fact, that is why many of us sought out drugs: to numb those bad feelings. So, in sobriety, when those feelings come back, we retreat to the way we always dealt with them – by using drugs.

For those who do not have an actual mental health diagnosis, depression is still a factor, as it is for non addicts and alcoholics. Depression is a fact of life. But again, for recovering addicts and alcoholics, the temptation to escape these negative feelings may become too great to deal with and lead them to relapse. It is important to learn coping mechanisms that don’t involve drug use in order to achieve emotional stability in recovery.

Relapse Excuse #7. Feeling happy

Conversely, many people who have experienced a relapse say that it is when things are going really well that they slip up. Perhaps it is a way of rewarding themselves for doing so well. For others, it is a way to increase the already good feeling they have naturally. As addicts and alcoholics, we seek to increase the pleasure-causing chemicals in our brains while in active addiction. Once we are sober, it might be that this “taste” of euphoria from normal everyday good things, that is enough of a high for others, is just what it takes to leave us craving something more intense therefore causing some to seek it in drugs and resulting in a relapse.

Relapse Excuse #8. “Forgetting”

So many times, I have heard people who relapse say that they weren’t sure anymore whether they were an alcoholic or addict. So, they decide to go back out and “test the waters.” People will use the relapse excuse that they decided they weren’t really an addict and/or alcoholic in order to start drinking and drugging again.

 

 

Sources:

http://alcoholism.about.com/

http://www.psychologytoday.com/

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

How to Start a Halfway House

How to Start a Halfway House

 

What is a Halfway House?

Halfway Houses are transitional living places for those in recovery from drugs or alcohol. They are also called sober houses. Some people go to halfway houses from a treatment center, prison, or a homeless situation, while others go there to be in a sober and clean environment to begin the recovery process. Some residents are in halfway houses due to court orders.

Aspects of a Halfway House

Many halfway houses are run by people who themselves were at one time a halfway house resident. The houses accommodate either men or women. Most halfway houses require residents to pass breathalyzer and drug screening tests. Some houses have curfews.

Make sure the house is located so that your residents can easily get to AA and NA meetings. In recovery, we are self-supporting. Be certain that you are clear on what is expected from you and what you expect from your residents. Assign cleaning chores, including making their beds and keeping their rooms tidy.

Choose a house near public transportation for those of your residents who do not have their own transportation.

Why You Should Start a Halfway House

You should only open a halfway house if you are passionate about the cause. And, if you are passionate, it can be done with little or no money. There are various grants and loans available to get a house started. Learn from experience and check with someone who already has a house to see how to open one.

How to Start a Halfway House

Step 1: Acquire the licenses and permits needed to operate a halfway house in the community you select.

Step 2: Purchase or lease a property. Your financial circumstances may dictate this choice, but county, city, township and other lawmaking agencies frequently require property ownership before they are willing to sanction a halfway house in a residential neighborhood. Once you find one or more likely properties, have your top choices inspected by a certified building inspector to avoid “buyer’s remorse.”

Step 3: Renovate the property. Unless the home you buy was operated as a halfway house in the past, you’ll likely have to modify it to accommodate zoning laws that sanction the number of people you can house there, or any personal limits you’ve placed on resident capacity. Purchase insurance to cover the house and its contents, and add liability coverage to protect your personal assets from lawsuits. A regular homeowner’s policy isn’t adequate for a group home.

Step 4: Hire staff and create policies, rules and regulations. Having staff in place before the first resident arrives is a huge advantage, because experienced halfway house employees can help you write an operations manual and set rules, regulations and policies that will guide both clients and staff. Make sure you run background checks on everyone, from counselors to housekeeping employees.

Step 5: Set up the accounting aspects of your halfway house so it operates smoothly well into the future. Accurate records are important if you want your sponsors to continue making financial contributions, and it goes without saying that finding additional sponsors will be an ongoing activity.

Step 6: Implement programming. Residents released from rehab programs require an inordinate amount of structure in their lives so they can learn to become responsible members of both the halfway house and the outside world. Establish tight schedules that include mandated housekeeping chores, group counseling sessions, one-on-one therapy time, recreational activities, job searching and life skill building time. Plan social events, meetings and include alone time.

Remember: It is unlawful to discriminate in housing. The Supreme Court has ruled that recovering alcoholics and drug addicts are a protected class under the handicapped provisions of the Federal Fair Housing Act Amendments of 1988. If you seek a house in a good neighborhood, you’ll find it.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.sba.gov

http://halfwayhouse.com

http://smallbusiness.chron.com

http://soberhouse.net

 

 

 

 

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Government Aid for People Living in Halfway Housing

Government Aid for People Living in Halfway Housing

Halfway houses are also called recovery houses. They allow recovering addicts to begin reintegrating with society while receiving support and monitoring. Recovering addicts who live in halfway houses are at a reduced risk of relapse compared to recovering addicts who go directly from a treatment program back into society. The average stay at a halfway house ranges from one to six months, and behavioral health insurance typically covers all or a portion of the cost of the stay. People living in halfway housing generally must be able to support themselves, pay their rent, and purchase their own food. They are usually required to work or must be actively seeking work. All residents must attend a minimum number of 12-step meetings each week, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, Cocaine Anonymous, or Narcotics Anonymous. Rent ranges from $250 to $1,450 per month, with the average ranging from about $450 to $750 per month. No security deposit is required, no first and last months’ rent are required, and no credit checks are performed. Utilities are included in the cost of rent and most homes allow residents to pay their rent on a weekly basis.

There is not a lot of government aid for people living in halfway housing. Residents of halfway houses are technically considered to be homeless and as such are eligible for much of the same programs as homeless populations.

Government Aid for People Living in Halfway Housing: Rental Assistance

Depending on the state and even the community within which people living in halfway housing reside, there are programs for rental assistance and other supportive services to homeless substance abusers and individuals with disabilities. These services are provided to their family members as well.

Government Aid for People Living in Halfway Housing: Food Assistance

People living in halfway housing are eligible for food stamp programs. Nowadays called SNAP (the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program), it is a federal nutrition program that helps you stretch your food budget and buy healthy food. SNAP benefits can be used to purchase food at grocery stores, convenience stores, and some farmers’ markets and co-op food programs.

 

Government Aid for People Living in Halfway Housing: Health Insurance

For some people living in halfway houses, there is access to the federal health insurance program, Medicaid. Many people are getting back on their own two feet and so they are likely income eligible for Medicaid.

 

Although there is not much in the way of government aid for people living in halfway housing, the programs that are available make a big difference in the lives of recovering alcoholics and addicts because they lessen the financial burden of putting their lives back together. With help to pay for groceries and free healthcare, the alcoholic/addict is more likely to be able to afford their rent at the halfway house. Many of those in recovery have never even had to support themselves and so it is a learning experience in how to be a productive member of society. The halfway house supports alcoholics and addicts in their recovery program by establishing structure and providing a safe living environment. It is up to the people living in halfway housing to learn how to provide for themselves financially. And the government programs listed above can help them to do so.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

What is a Three-Quarter House?

 Three Quarterway House

A Three-Quarter House is a sober-living house or community. In order to understand what a Three-Quarter House is, you must first understand what a Halfway House is.

What is a Halfway House?

A halfway house is a communal living space for recovering alcoholics and addicts who want to transition back to independent living after having completed inpatient treatment or for those who have committed to a sober lifestyle without having undergone treatment.  A three-quarter house is much like this; it is another level of transition before going back out into the world.

After living for some time, usually 3 to 6 months, at a halfway house, many recovering alcoholics and addicts opt to move into a three-quarter house before getting their own apartment or before returning to their living situations prior to getting clean and sober, including returning to their families and  normal home life. For those with families, even those that include children, living in three-quarters houses is beneficial as an added level of support to the recovery process.

So Then, What is a Three-Quarter House?

The main distinction between a halfway house and a three-quarter house is that there are many more freedoms granted to residents of three-quarter living. Often times, there is still a curfew imposed by the three-quarter house rules but it is later than that of a halfway house. Also, residents get to stay out even later on weekends. Another freedom afforded to residents is the overnight and weekend pass which allows them to go on trips and mini-vacations or to visit their families.

What to expect

Just like halfway houses, three-quarter houses are designed to support and encourage recovering alcoholics and addicts as they navigate the process of getting back on their feet, so to speak. While living at a three-quarter house, residents are encouraged to begin working again, as they are responsible for paying rent just like in any other housing situation. Three-quarter houses also provide much needed structure to their residents. There are rules and curfews. Residents are subject to random drug screening. This is to promote accountability as well as to ensure the safety and well-being of the other residents who are serious about their recovery. A typical requirement for living in a three-quarter house is to attend a specified number of 12 Step fellowship meetings (i.e. AA, NA, or CA). Again, this is done to ensure accountability on the residents’ behalf that they are continuing to work a program while doing all the typical day-to-day activities such as going to work, grocery shopping, etc.

Additional benefits and support

Besides providing a safe, drug-free environment, three-quarter houses may provide their own, or access to intensive outpatient programs. These programs offer continuing group therapy to residents of three-quarter houses and usually do so in the form of evening sessions so that residents can attend work while receiving therapy. Being a sober living community in and of itself can be beneficial to its residents because they have the added benefit of living with sober peers. Often times, residents of the three-quarter house will have impromptu and informal meetings amongst themselves. Or they may even decide to have weekly meetings and literature (i.e. the Big Book) study groups.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

How to fight emotional triggers in recovery

How to fight emotional triggers in recovery

Triggers are specific memories, behaviors, thoughts, emotions, and situations that jeopardize recovery. Triggers are signals you are entering a stage that brings you closer to a relapse. Triggers are the stimuli, the people, places, situations, emotional states, thoughts, etc. that can “trigger” an ingrained ritualistic response which in most cases is to get high. Learning to identify relapse triggers and especially the emotional intensity that they invoke can be an effective tool in how to fight emotional triggers in recovery.

If you really want to know how to fight emotional triggers in recovery then the best place you can start is by learning what they are. For instance, deep sadness or extreme excitement might be emotional states that trigger you. If you know those are your emotional triggers in recovery then you can begin to fight against them.

Once you know what your emotional triggers in recovery are you can then begin to set in a place a plan of action for yourself. A plan of action for fighting emotional triggers in recovery can consist of multiple different things. For instance say an emotional trigger in recovery for you is excitement. If you begin to feel that excitement and it makes you think about using you can have a plan that first consist of calling a sober support, second doing something to get your mind off of it. No matter what it is that you use to fight emotional triggers in recovery make sure that you are taking action. Change your state.

A good way to fight emotional triggers in recovery is to go for a run when you begin thinking about using. You could also choose to turn on some music and dance your heart out. You can go workout at the gym. You can go for a bike ride. You can meditate. You can read a book. You can really do whatever it is that works for you to fight emotional triggers in recovery as long as it’s something different than what you would normally do. A lot of the times when addicts and alcoholics feel emotionally triggered in recovery they don’t know why they are thinking about using and they have no idea what to do instead of go and get high. This can lead to relapse without the proper identification of what is going on and what to do when it happens.

This is why identifying what triggers you emotionally and then making a plan of action for yourself when emotional triggers pop up is the best way to fight emotional triggers in recovery. It is not easy to fight emotional triggers in recovery in fact addicts and alcoholics are hardwired to use in certain instances that’s why its good to have a plan in place before you are ever get triggered. Once you are able to implement your plan to fight emotional triggers in recovery multiple times it will get easier to ward off. If you make a habit of fighting your emotional triggers in recovery eventually it won’t be so difficult and then you may even find you aren’t triggered by the emotional states at all now.

 

 

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

If I relapse should I go back to rehab?

Should I go back to rehab?

If I relapse should I go back to rehab?

Working in addiction treatment, this is a question that I hear all the time. Many people who go back to using drugs and alcohol after treatment don’t think they should go back to rehab if they relapse. They’ll say things like “I’ve been to rehab before and it didn’t work” or “I already know everything they have to tell me.” The thing is, rehab is a lot more than therapy and learning about recovery. Even if you feel like you have learned everything you need to know about the disease of addiction and yourself, there are still reasons you should go back to rehab if you relapse.

If I relapse should I go back to rehab? Environmental

One of the most important things about rehab is that it gives you a safe place to be during those early days of recovery. The first thirty days are often the hardest, and many addicts and alcoholics relapse during this time, especially if they are in the same environment where they were using. If you want different results, you need to do something differently, and changing your environment is one of the first changes you should make. Just because you know how to get sober, it doesn’t mean you actually can or will do it. This is why it is important for you to go back to rehab if you relapse.

If I relapse should I go back to rehab? Support

One of the most important reasons you should go back to rehab if you relapse is because of the support system it provides. The real thing that keeps people clean and sober is not knowledge of recovery, it is their relationships with other people; their support system. There is a reason that 12 step groups have meetings and you are supposed to get a sponsor-we need other people to recover. What most people need in early recovery is support from people who understand what they are going through, not tips on “how to avoid triggers.” They need to see people who were once where they are and who have had success in recovery. They need to build relationships with people who can show them how they can attain lasting recovery.

If I relapse should I go back to rehab? Knowledge

Ok, you may think that you know everything about recovery, but you don’t. Recovery is not about memorizing the 12 steps or reading every page of recovery literature. If you went back to drugs and alcohol, then there were obviously some fundamental things you did not learn in rehab. For example:

  • You did not surrender.
  • You did not take suggestions from people who were trying to help you.
  • You weren’t completely honest.
  • You were not open minded enough to learn everything you needed to know.

Most people who relapse, if they’re being honest with themselves, know that they did not grasp one or more of these fundamental concepts. Going back to rehab if you relapse is the safest and smartest option and it gives you the best chance for recovery in the future.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

My roommate is eating my food. What do I do?

My roommate is eating my food. What do I do?

My roommate is eating my food. What do I do?

Living with a roommate, whether it is someone who is related to you, a friend, spouse, or total stranger inevitably will always lead to some kind of conflict at one point or another. It is normal! Setting healthy boundaries with your roommate can be one of the biggest steps you take towards making your living situation a positive on for both of you.

The most obvious thing to do when your roommate is eating your food is to have a conversation with them about it. Having a conversation with your roommate can be done politely. If they admit they have been eating the food or that maybe some of their guests are you can just very simply ask them to stop. If not, you may need to be more firm about your suspicions that they are eating your food and consider if there is any other possible way that your food could have gone missing. If your roommate gets offended that you asked her about it, stay relaxed and explain that you aren’t angry, you just wanted to stop it from happening again.

Another thing you can do is start clearly labeling your food or keeping it secure in your bedroom or in a personal refrigerator. This plan could be really helpful if talking to your roommate didn’t make a difference. You could also decide to only shop for food on the day that you are going to eat as a way of keeping your roommate from even having a way to get it. When you don’t have any food in the fridge there is no way for your roommate to eat it.

In a situation where your roommate is eating your food the best bet is sometimes to focus on preventing it rather than trying to stop it all together. It is sometimes a good idea before starting to live with someone to set up a roommate agreement. If you haven’t done this you could try doing it now. An agreement between your roommates sets up rules and expectations when it comes to things such as having people over, how to pay for utilities, and when it is okay to use each other’s stuff.

In a worst case scenario you may find that your roommate is not eating your food because they are inconsiderate but maybe because they have an eating disorder. If there is a chance your roommate could have an eating disorder you might want to talk to them privately about it and set up some protocol for how you can help. Make the concern about their health not the missing food if this is the case.

If none of these things help with your roommate stealing your food you might need to begin looking for another place to stay or another roommate you can live with that you are more comfortable around. If your food disappearing is really a big issue this may be something to think about especially because being able to trust your roommate is so important.

If you need help with an addiction problem please give us a call at 800-507-7389.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Cheap and Easy Meals

Cheap and Easy Meals

Beef Kebabs

Cheap and Easy Meals

Green Salad with Apples and Toasted Walnuts

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup walnut pieces
  • 2 Granny Smith or other tart apples, cored, halved and thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons minced shallot
  • 1 teaspoon sugar $
  • Salt and pepper 1/3 cup olive oil $
  • 8 cups mixed salad greens $

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Spread walnut pieces on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake walnuts for 5 to 8 minutes, stirring every 2 minutes, until just toasted. Pour into a bowl to cool.

2. Place apples in a bowl and toss with 1 Tbsp. vinegar. In a small bowl, whisk together remaining vinegar, mustard, shallot and sugar; season with salt and pepper. Whisking constantly, drizzle in olive oil and continue to whisk until smoothly blended.

3. Place salad greens, apples and walnuts in a large bowl. Toss with dressing just before serving.

 

Beef Kebabs with Orange Glaze

Save money by making beef kebabs with boneless sirloin instead of beef tenderloin. You can whip up the orange sauce with on-hand ingredients such as orange juice concentrate, soy sauce, and mustard.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup frozen orange juice concentrate
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  •  4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted $
  • 1 1/2 pounds boneless sirloin, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 8 mushrooms, halved $
  • 1 red onion, quartered, layers separated
  • 1/2 pint cherry tomatoes $
  • Salt and pepper

Preparation

Preheat broiler or prepare a charcoal fire and let burn to a gray ash. Stir orange juice concentrate with soy sauce, mustard and butter in a small saucepan over medium-high heat until smooth, 2 minutes.

Thread beef onto 8 long metal skewers, dividing evenly and alternating with mushrooms, onion pieces and cherry tomatoes. Brush orange mixture evenly over threaded skewers and season with salt and pepper. Bring any remaining glaze to a boil in saucepan, then remove from heat and reserve.

Set broiling pan or grill about 6 inches from heat source. Broil or grill skewers for 6 to 8 minutes, turning often, until meat and mushrooms are browned and onions are just charred on edges. Serve kebabs warm with remaining glaze on the side.

Quick Risotto

No time to cook? No problem! Grab a can of cream of mushroom soup and check out this quick and easy risotto recipe.  Serve with rotisserie chicken and canned vegetables for the ultimate weeknight meal.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound orzo 1 tablespoon unsalted butter $
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried herbes de Provence or dried thyme
  •  1 cup cream of mushroom soup
  • 1 cup milk $
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan
  • Black pepper

Preparation

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add orzo and cook until al dente, according to package directions. Drain well in a colander.

In same pot, melt butter over medium heat, add onion and herbes de Provence, and cook, stirring, until softened, about 4 minutes. Whisk in soup and milk. Stir in cooked orzo and parsley. Serve with Parmesan cheese and season with pepper.

Creamy Chicken and Broccoli Curry

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds chicken tenders $
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  •  1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped (2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons hot (madras) curry powder
  • 1 (14 oz.) can chicken broth $
  • 1 (10 oz.) box frozen broccoli florets, thawed
  • 1/2 cup sour cream $

Preparation

Place chicken tenders in a large bowl; sprinkle 1/2 tsp. salt and 1/4 tsp. pepper on top. Add flour and stir to coat chicken.

In a large nonstick skillet, heat half of oil over medium-high heat. Add half of chicken and cook, turning once or twice, until golden on both sides, about 4 minutes. Transfer chicken to a plate and repeat using remaining oil and chicken tenders.

Add onion, curry powder, and remaining 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper to pan and cook, stirring, until onion softens, about 5 minutes. Add broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until sauce is reduced by half, 3 to 4 minutes. Return chicken to pan and cook, turning, for 2 minutes. Add broccoli and cook, stirring, for 1 to 2 minutes.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer chicken and broccoli to plates. Remove skillet from heat, stir in sour cream and then spoon sauce on top of chicken.

Black Bean Burgers

These Black Bean Burgers with full-bodied flavor are a great option for those vegetarian and meatless options out there.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 15-oz. can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten $
  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • 1/2 cup plain bread crumbs
  • Salt and pepper

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Line a large, rimmed baking sheet with foil; grease lightly.

2. Warm oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add celery and onion and cook, stirring often, until softened, 3 to 5 minutes. Add garlic and sauté 1 minute longer.

3. Pour beans into a large bowl and use a fork or potato masher to mash into a thick paste. Scrape vegetables from skillet into bowl. Stir in egg, cumin and bread crumbs. Season with salt and pepper. Use your fingers to form into 4 patties (do not overmix). Place patties on baking sheet and bake until firm and set, about 10 minutes on each side. Serve on whole-grain buns with lettuce, tomato and sliced red onion, if desired.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

The dangers of living on your own after rehab

The dangers of living on your own after rehab

 

There are dangers of living on your own after rehab but there are also dangers of living on your own in any situation. Unfortunately for those straight out of rehab the dangers are a little bit different than they are for other people. This has to do a lot with the fact that addicts and alcoholics after rehab can relapse and also may not have the life skills needed to support themselves living on their own due to their drug use and drinking for so long.

Living on your own after rehab – Relapsing

The biggest and most obvious danger of living on your own after rehab is the potential to relapse. Not all addicts and alcoholics who live on their own after rehab end up relapsing but many do because of the lack of accountability. This is why most rehabs will recommend a stay at a halfway house after rehab. When an addict or alcoholic begins living on their own after rehab it is not guaranteed that they have stopped obsessing about doing drugs and drinking. With no one around to make sure they aren’t drinking and that they are doing what they are supposed to do for their recovery this can easily lead to an alcoholic or addict thinking they can get drunk or high again with no problems. Also there is no potential for getting caught when an addict and alcoholic lives on their own after rehab. The consequences are not as tangible and can’t be imagined as easily because there really are no consequences such as getting kicked out of a halfway house and becoming homeless etc. There are no drug tests, no other people in recovery, nothing to make sure the addict and alcoholic won’t end up drinking and using drugs again.

Living on your own after rehab – Self-Care

The second and other biggest danger of living on your own after rehab is the ability to take care of yourself. Many addicts and alcoholics come into rehab with no idea on how to live a manageable and functional life. Many younger addicts and alcoholics have no life experiences whatsoever. In fact some may not know how to cook, hold a job, or fend for themselves. This can become a disaster waiting to happen. Usually it is good for an addict or alcoholic to spend some time in a halfway house to begin learning these things and getting a job before they are totally on their own. Living on their own straight out of rehab can lead to reckless spending, addictive habits (that may or may not be using drugs and drinking) such as unsafe sex, gambling, etc. This is all because there is no one to hold them accountable to doing what they should be doing to take care of themselves. A lot of addicts and alcoholics find themselves living on their own with empty apartments that have nothing but a mattress on the floor because they have no realization what it takes to build a home. The little things have always been taken care of for them.

These are the two biggest dangers of living on your own after rehab. This is why if you really want to propel your future in recovery it probably is the best decision to spend some time at a halfway house being accountable and learning to take care of yourself again and a halfway house can give you this. A halfway house can’t guarantee sobriety but it can make it a little bit easier to get the hang of things. Living on your own after rehab is a danger you don’t want to risk. Especially because it can lead to relapse if action towards recovery isn’t taken and relapse could mean death.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.