Comfort Eating in Recovery

Comfort Eating in Recovery

Beating an addiction and moving into recovery is no easy feat. In order to build a successful life a recovered addict has to change almost everything in their life. It is a really emotional time for the individual. And to add to the challenge, the individual will no longer be able to use d rugs and alcohol to comfort themselves. Even when the individual is years into their recovery they sometimes will have a hard time contending with their emotions. Life is and always will be filled with ups and downs and emotional highs and lows.  Unfortunately sometimes when people in recovery have difficult emotions, while it is good they won’t use drugs or drink, they eat instead. This is called comfort eating in recovery.

What is comfort eating in recovery?

Comfort eating is sometimes referred to as emotional eating or feeding your feelings. Comfort eating usually is a result of emotions not because of hunger. It is believe the main reason people overeat is due to comfort eating and it is also believed to be one of the main causes of obesity. Comfort eating is believed to originate in childhood when treats such as candy are used to deal with unpleasant or difficult events. People during childhood then learn the association between food and comfort so they continue this behavior long into their adulthood.

Comfort eating in recovery

Individuals who have dealt with addiction are at a particularly high risk of turning to comfort eating in order to deal with their emotions. The first few months and even years of sobriety can be like an emotional rollercoaster so the temptation or want to turn to food for comfort is really high. This individual can justify their comfort eating with the rationalization that they are better turning towards food for comfort rather than food. The problem with comfort eating in recovery is that it is not a harmless activity. Comfort eating in recovery can lead to many problems with their health as well as interfere with their ability to fully enjoy recovery. Comfort eating in recovery also can be a means to deny problems in their life and this is especially dangerous. Denying problems was a big part of why they used drugs and alcohol so this behavior can be especially foreshadowing and dangerous. Occasionally turning towards food for comfort is ok but doing it all the time in recovery can end up in disaster.

What are some other dangers of comfort eating in recovery?

  • Comfort eating in recovery can easily lead people to become overweight. Comfort eating often causes people to eat a lot more than their body needs.
  • Comfort eating in recovery can cause nutritional deficiencies. If a person isn’t eating a balanced diet they can end up with health problems
  • Comfort eating can damage the self-esteem by causing the individual to gain a lot of weight. A person who feels less good about themselves is in danger of comfort eating even more.

How to avoid comfort eating in recovery

  • Staying mindful while eating is important to not comfort eating in recovery. People who pay closer attention to what and why they eat are less likely to comfort eat.
  • Talking to other people instead of comfort eating in recovery can be especially helpful to deal with difficult emotions and pent up feelings.
  • Facing the root or why they eat for comfort. If it is something that is bothering them they will need to get past it to get past comfort eating in recovery.

 

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Government Aid for People Living in Halfway Housing

Government Aid for People Living in Halfway Housing

Halfway houses are also called recovery houses. They allow recovering addicts to begin reintegrating with society while receiving support and monitoring. Recovering addicts who live in halfway houses are at a reduced risk of relapse compared to recovering addicts who go directly from a treatment program back into society. The average stay at a halfway house ranges from one to six months, and behavioral health insurance typically covers all or a portion of the cost of the stay. People living in halfway housing generally must be able to support themselves, pay their rent, and purchase their own food. They are usually required to work or must be actively seeking work. All residents must attend a minimum number of 12-step meetings each week, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, Cocaine Anonymous, or Narcotics Anonymous. Rent ranges from $250 to $1,450 per month, with the average ranging from about $450 to $750 per month. No security deposit is required, no first and last months’ rent are required, and no credit checks are performed. Utilities are included in the cost of rent and most homes allow residents to pay their rent on a weekly basis.

There is not a lot of government aid for people living in halfway housing. Residents of halfway houses are technically considered to be homeless and as such are eligible for much of the same programs as homeless populations.

Government Aid for People Living in Halfway Housing: Rental Assistance

Depending on the state and even the community within which people living in halfway housing reside, there are programs for rental assistance and other supportive services to homeless substance abusers and individuals with disabilities. These services are provided to their family members as well.

Government Aid for People Living in Halfway Housing: Food Assistance

People living in halfway housing are eligible for food stamp programs. Nowadays called SNAP (the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program), it is a federal nutrition program that helps you stretch your food budget and buy healthy food. SNAP benefits can be used to purchase food at grocery stores, convenience stores, and some farmers’ markets and co-op food programs.

 

Government Aid for People Living in Halfway Housing: Health Insurance

For some people living in halfway houses, there is access to the federal health insurance program, Medicaid. Many people are getting back on their own two feet and so they are likely income eligible for Medicaid.

 

Although there is not much in the way of government aid for people living in halfway housing, the programs that are available make a big difference in the lives of recovering alcoholics and addicts because they lessen the financial burden of putting their lives back together. With help to pay for groceries and free healthcare, the alcoholic/addict is more likely to be able to afford their rent at the halfway house. Many of those in recovery have never even had to support themselves and so it is a learning experience in how to be a productive member of society. The halfway house supports alcoholics and addicts in their recovery program by establishing structure and providing a safe living environment. It is up to the people living in halfway housing to learn how to provide for themselves financially. And the government programs listed above can help them to do so.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

My roommate is eating my food. What do I do?

My roommate is eating my food. What do I do?

My roommate is eating my food. What do I do?

Living with a roommate, whether it is someone who is related to you, a friend, spouse, or total stranger inevitably will always lead to some kind of conflict at one point or another. It is normal! Setting healthy boundaries with your roommate can be one of the biggest steps you take towards making your living situation a positive on for both of you.

The most obvious thing to do when your roommate is eating your food is to have a conversation with them about it. Having a conversation with your roommate can be done politely. If they admit they have been eating the food or that maybe some of their guests are you can just very simply ask them to stop. If not, you may need to be more firm about your suspicions that they are eating your food and consider if there is any other possible way that your food could have gone missing. If your roommate gets offended that you asked her about it, stay relaxed and explain that you aren’t angry, you just wanted to stop it from happening again.

Another thing you can do is start clearly labeling your food or keeping it secure in your bedroom or in a personal refrigerator. This plan could be really helpful if talking to your roommate didn’t make a difference. You could also decide to only shop for food on the day that you are going to eat as a way of keeping your roommate from even having a way to get it. When you don’t have any food in the fridge there is no way for your roommate to eat it.

In a situation where your roommate is eating your food the best bet is sometimes to focus on preventing it rather than trying to stop it all together. It is sometimes a good idea before starting to live with someone to set up a roommate agreement. If you haven’t done this you could try doing it now. An agreement between your roommates sets up rules and expectations when it comes to things such as having people over, how to pay for utilities, and when it is okay to use each other’s stuff.

In a worst case scenario you may find that your roommate is not eating your food because they are inconsiderate but maybe because they have an eating disorder. If there is a chance your roommate could have an eating disorder you might want to talk to them privately about it and set up some protocol for how you can help. Make the concern about their health not the missing food if this is the case.

If none of these things help with your roommate stealing your food you might need to begin looking for another place to stay or another roommate you can live with that you are more comfortable around. If your food disappearing is really a big issue this may be something to think about especially because being able to trust your roommate is so important.

If you need help with an addiction problem please give us a call at 800-507-7389.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.

Cheap and Easy Meals

Cheap and Easy Meals

Beef Kebabs

Cheap and Easy Meals

Green Salad with Apples and Toasted Walnuts

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup walnut pieces
  • 2 Granny Smith or other tart apples, cored, halved and thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons minced shallot
  • 1 teaspoon sugar $
  • Salt and pepper 1/3 cup olive oil $
  • 8 cups mixed salad greens $

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Spread walnut pieces on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake walnuts for 5 to 8 minutes, stirring every 2 minutes, until just toasted. Pour into a bowl to cool.

2. Place apples in a bowl and toss with 1 Tbsp. vinegar. In a small bowl, whisk together remaining vinegar, mustard, shallot and sugar; season with salt and pepper. Whisking constantly, drizzle in olive oil and continue to whisk until smoothly blended.

3. Place salad greens, apples and walnuts in a large bowl. Toss with dressing just before serving.

 

Beef Kebabs with Orange Glaze

Save money by making beef kebabs with boneless sirloin instead of beef tenderloin. You can whip up the orange sauce with on-hand ingredients such as orange juice concentrate, soy sauce, and mustard.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup frozen orange juice concentrate
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  •  4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted $
  • 1 1/2 pounds boneless sirloin, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 8 mushrooms, halved $
  • 1 red onion, quartered, layers separated
  • 1/2 pint cherry tomatoes $
  • Salt and pepper

Preparation

Preheat broiler or prepare a charcoal fire and let burn to a gray ash. Stir orange juice concentrate with soy sauce, mustard and butter in a small saucepan over medium-high heat until smooth, 2 minutes.

Thread beef onto 8 long metal skewers, dividing evenly and alternating with mushrooms, onion pieces and cherry tomatoes. Brush orange mixture evenly over threaded skewers and season with salt and pepper. Bring any remaining glaze to a boil in saucepan, then remove from heat and reserve.

Set broiling pan or grill about 6 inches from heat source. Broil or grill skewers for 6 to 8 minutes, turning often, until meat and mushrooms are browned and onions are just charred on edges. Serve kebabs warm with remaining glaze on the side.

Quick Risotto

No time to cook? No problem! Grab a can of cream of mushroom soup and check out this quick and easy risotto recipe.  Serve with rotisserie chicken and canned vegetables for the ultimate weeknight meal.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound orzo 1 tablespoon unsalted butter $
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried herbes de Provence or dried thyme
  •  1 cup cream of mushroom soup
  • 1 cup milk $
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/3 cup shredded Parmesan
  • Black pepper

Preparation

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add orzo and cook until al dente, according to package directions. Drain well in a colander.

In same pot, melt butter over medium heat, add onion and herbes de Provence, and cook, stirring, until softened, about 4 minutes. Whisk in soup and milk. Stir in cooked orzo and parsley. Serve with Parmesan cheese and season with pepper.

Creamy Chicken and Broccoli Curry

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds chicken tenders $
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  •  1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped (2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons hot (madras) curry powder
  • 1 (14 oz.) can chicken broth $
  • 1 (10 oz.) box frozen broccoli florets, thawed
  • 1/2 cup sour cream $

Preparation

Place chicken tenders in a large bowl; sprinkle 1/2 tsp. salt and 1/4 tsp. pepper on top. Add flour and stir to coat chicken.

In a large nonstick skillet, heat half of oil over medium-high heat. Add half of chicken and cook, turning once or twice, until golden on both sides, about 4 minutes. Transfer chicken to a plate and repeat using remaining oil and chicken tenders.

Add onion, curry powder, and remaining 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper to pan and cook, stirring, until onion softens, about 5 minutes. Add broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until sauce is reduced by half, 3 to 4 minutes. Return chicken to pan and cook, turning, for 2 minutes. Add broccoli and cook, stirring, for 1 to 2 minutes.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer chicken and broccoli to plates. Remove skillet from heat, stir in sour cream and then spoon sauce on top of chicken.

Black Bean Burgers

These Black Bean Burgers with full-bodied flavor are a great option for those vegetarian and meatless options out there.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 15-oz. can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten $
  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • 1/2 cup plain bread crumbs
  • Salt and pepper

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Line a large, rimmed baking sheet with foil; grease lightly.

2. Warm oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add celery and onion and cook, stirring often, until softened, 3 to 5 minutes. Add garlic and sauté 1 minute longer.

3. Pour beans into a large bowl and use a fork or potato masher to mash into a thick paste. Scrape vegetables from skillet into bowl. Stir in egg, cumin and bread crumbs. Season with salt and pepper. Use your fingers to form into 4 patties (do not overmix). Place patties on baking sheet and bake until firm and set, about 10 minutes on each side. Serve on whole-grain buns with lettuce, tomato and sliced red onion, if desired.

If you need help with your addiction please call us at 800-507-7389.